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Geothermal baths at Deildartunguhver


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Geothermal baths at Deildartunguhver


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About Krauma


Just 70meters north of the natural hot spring Deildartunguhver KRAUMA  geothermal nature baths is now under development.   Ground breaking took place on April 26th this year, with construction beginning a couple of days later.  The 550m2 building will consist of a Main Building, with changing facilities for 140 people, a restaurant and bar, and a souvenir shop.  Outdoors on the premises you will be able to enjoy hot tubs, saunas and a unique tranquility room.

Easy access to the Deildartunguhver hot springs will be  provided by a heated walkway.  Parking will be ample.  Travelers will also be able to arrive by helecopter, a heleport is being built just west of Krauma, conected by a walking path.

The Architect is Brynhildur Sólveigardóttir.

The project manager is Sigurður Árni Magnússon.

 

 

 

 

About Krauma


Just 70meters north of the natural hot spring Deildartunguhver KRAUMA  geothermal nature baths is now under development.   Ground breaking took place on April 26th this year, with construction beginning a couple of days later.  The 550m2 building will consist of a Main Building, with changing facilities for 140 people, a restaurant and bar, and a souvenir shop.  Outdoors on the premises you will be able to enjoy hot tubs, saunas and a unique tranquility room.

Easy access to the Deildartunguhver hot springs will be  provided by a heated walkway.  Parking will be ample.  Travelers will also be able to arrive by helecopter, a heleport is being built just west of Krauma, conected by a walking path.

The Architect is Brynhildur Sólveigardóttir.

The project manager is Sigurður Árni Magnússon.

 

 

 

 

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Baths


The main attraction of KRAUMA will be its natural geothermal baths. With changing facilities available to 140 people, we invite you to enjoy a relaxing dip into  various geothermal baths, all containing the completely natural geothermal water from Deildartunguhver spring.  To cool the scalding hot water we will use pristine cold water from the Rauðsgil ravine, located 5 km away . No chemicals will be added to the water, its constant and rapid flow   will ensure its purity .

The baths are being built from natural materials and the design of the entire area will demonstrate our respect for nature and offer you a completely natural experience.  Aside from the hot tubs we will offer two distinct steam baths, each with its own aromatic theme, and for those who want to balance their energy , and who dare, we offer an ice cold bath that surely gets your blood running!  To make your experience at Krauma perfect, you may end by relaxing in the Tranquility room where you will hear soothing music and enjoy the heat and the sizzle of a fire place.  

Baths


The main attraction of KRAUMA will be its natural geothermal baths. With changing facilities available to 140 people, we invite you to enjoy a relaxing dip into  various geothermal baths, all containing the completely natural geothermal water from Deildartunguhver spring.  To cool the scalding hot water we will use pristine cold water from the Rauðsgil ravine, located 5 km away . No chemicals will be added to the water, its constant and rapid flow   will ensure its purity .

The baths are being built from natural materials and the design of the entire area will demonstrate our respect for nature and offer you a completely natural experience.  Aside from the hot tubs we will offer two distinct steam baths, each with its own aromatic theme, and for those who want to balance their energy , and who dare, we offer an ice cold bath that surely gets your blood running!  To make your experience at Krauma perfect, you may end by relaxing in the Tranquility room where you will hear soothing music and enjoy the heat and the sizzle of a fire place.  

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Deildartunguhver


Hot water from Deildartunguhver is themain source of heat for the homes in the towns of Borgarnes 34 km away andand Akranes 64 km away. The spring has the highest flow of hot springs in Europe,  at 97°C it pumps out about 180 liters per second. This volume of water would suffice to fill a 25 meter swimming pool in one hour.

The hot spring used to be the private property of Sigurbjörg Björnsdóttir who lived at Deildartunga farm, butwasappropriated by the Icelandic government in 1979. The geothermal waterworksof Akranes and Borgarnes was foundedthat same year and handed the spring to use.  In 2010 the Icelandic Geothermal Power company took over. It has the rights to the spring for the next 55 years.

  - The spring has a long history of being usedfor heating in Deildartunga.  A wooden pipeline and later an asbestos pipe was built between the spring and the houses at the farm and steam was piped into the houses.  The steam was used for space heating, it providedwater for washing, and food was steam boiled. Not only was the spring used for these purposes but steam was also used to power a corn mill.   The geothermal heat was, and is, used to warm vegetable gardens in it's vicinity. Originally a wooded pipeline was laid from the southern most spring, across a nearby brook and into the gardens.  The top of the spring´s hillused to have a carrotgarden. There we have an ideal vegetation with a lot of warmth just a few centimeters underground.

In 1940 a horticultural farm was founded in Viðigerði , where the hot water is used to heat the greenhouses. The farm is still producing delicious tomatoes that havesince 1989been offered for saleat the entrance of the spring.   All water used in the greenhouses, heating installations as well as watering systems, come from the spring.

There has been a long tradition of baking bread in the spring. The first loaves were baked in holes dug into the spring hill, then over steam inside the farm, butfor the last three decades the bread had been baked outside, over steam, under a roof. The baking time is just under 24 hours.

A very rare species of fern, called Hard fern or Deer fern (lat. Blechnum spicant) may be found at the spring.  This fern is considered the only one of its kind in the world. It is critically endangered and is thus protected.

Now we are pleased to begin using this natural phenomenon Deildartunguhver in a different manner. Guests will be able to bathe inwater directly from the spring;  hot water cooled by mountain water from the Rauðsgil ravine, water that comes from a source in the smallest glacier in Iceland, Mount Ok. 

Deildartunguhver


Hot water from Deildartunguhver is themain source of heat for the homes in the towns of Borgarnes 34 km away andand Akranes 64 km away. The spring has the highest flow of hot springs in Europe,  at 97°C it pumps out about 180 liters per second. This volume of water would suffice to fill a 25 meter swimming pool in one hour.

The hot spring used to be the private property of Sigurbjörg Björnsdóttir who lived at Deildartunga farm, butwasappropriated by the Icelandic government in 1979. The geothermal waterworksof Akranes and Borgarnes was foundedthat same year and handed the spring to use.  In 2010 the Icelandic Geothermal Power company took over. It has the rights to the spring for the next 55 years.

  - The spring has a long history of being usedfor heating in Deildartunga.  A wooden pipeline and later an asbestos pipe was built between the spring and the houses at the farm and steam was piped into the houses.  The steam was used for space heating, it providedwater for washing, and food was steam boiled. Not only was the spring used for these purposes but steam was also used to power a corn mill.   The geothermal heat was, and is, used to warm vegetable gardens in it's vicinity. Originally a wooded pipeline was laid from the southern most spring, across a nearby brook and into the gardens.  The top of the spring´s hillused to have a carrotgarden. There we have an ideal vegetation with a lot of warmth just a few centimeters underground.

In 1940 a horticultural farm was founded in Viðigerði , where the hot water is used to heat the greenhouses. The farm is still producing delicious tomatoes that havesince 1989been offered for saleat the entrance of the spring.   All water used in the greenhouses, heating installations as well as watering systems, come from the spring.

There has been a long tradition of baking bread in the spring. The first loaves were baked in holes dug into the spring hill, then over steam inside the farm, butfor the last three decades the bread had been baked outside, over steam, under a roof. The baking time is just under 24 hours.

A very rare species of fern, called Hard fern or Deer fern (lat. Blechnum spicant) may be found at the spring.  This fern is considered the only one of its kind in the world. It is critically endangered and is thus protected.

Now we are pleased to begin using this natural phenomenon Deildartunguhver in a different manner. Guests will be able to bathe inwater directly from the spring;  hot water cooled by mountain water from the Rauðsgil ravine, water that comes from a source in the smallest glacier in Iceland, Mount Ok.